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dc.contributor.advisorLarrañeta, Bárbara 
dc.contributor.advisorGalán González, José Luis
dc.contributor.authorAguilar Caro, Rocío 
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-26T17:16:46Z
dc.date.available2017-01-26T17:16:46Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.date.submitted2016-07-11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10433/3151
dc.descriptionPrograma de Doctorado en Administración y Dirección de Empresases_ES
dc.description.abstractDynamic Managerial Capabilities in New Ventures. Influence on Performance 1.1 Introduction The success and growth of New Ventures (NVs) plays a major role in our economies as they are the principal generators of new jobs (Birch, 1979) and the development of technological leadership (Zahra and Wright, 2015). For these reasons, the relationship between NVs and performance has received wide research attention over the past decades (Birley, 1987; McDougall, Robinson, and DeNisi, 1992; Zahra, Sapienza, and Davidsson, 2006). Scholars who promote the Resource-Based View (RBV) of the firm have worked on the assumption that sustained competitive advantage derives from the resources and capabilities controlled by a firm that are valuable, rare, imperfectly imitable, and not substitutable (Barney, 1991; Grant, 1991). Proponents of the dynamic capabilities approach have gone a step further by extending the RBV to dynamic markets, stating that performance differentials are explained by the capabilities by which firm managers integrate, build, and reconfigure internal and external competencies (Teece, Pisano, and Shuen, 1997). In the particular context of NVs, founding teams and managers have emerged as the key resource in pushing the venture forward within the competing space (Klotz, Hmieleski, Bradley, and Busenitz, 2014; Chahine, Filatotchev, and Zahra, 2011. As the routines and systems that lay the ground for the effective development of ordinary and dynamic organizational capabilities (Winter, 2000) are unlikely to be fully developed (Helfat and Lieberman, 2002). Indeed, advocates of the Upper Echelon Theory (UE) have provided evidence that executive cognitions, values, and perceptions have an influence on the process of strategic choice and the resultant performance outcomes (Hambrick and Mason, 1984). In this direction, the Dynamic Managerial Capabilities (DMCs) of NVs¿ founders and managers deserve special attention when trying to explain performance variations across new ventures. DMCs are the capabilities with which managers create, extend, and modify the ways in which firms make a living (Adner and Helfat, 2003). They draw on a set of underlying managerial resources, namely, managerial human capital, managerial social capital and managerial cognition, which provide the basis for the patterned aspects of managerial intentionality, deliberation, decision making, and action (Martin, 2011). DMCs constitute a ¿unique core¿ to the resource bundle of the firm, which then drives the creation, extension, and modification of the firm¿s resource portfolio, constituting the basis for why firms differ in their strategies and performance (Kor and Mesko, 2013; Townsend and Busenitz, 2014). Despite the importance of DMCs for a NV¿s ability to achieve congruence between its competencies and changing environmental conditions, we know little about DMCs in NVs. The literature needs to determine which the specific attributes of DMCs in NVs are and how differently these attributes contribute to NVs performance during the early stages of the venture. Moreover, DMCs are expected to be crucial under conditions of change, yet we do not know how variations in the level of change experimented in the firm environment affect the role played by the three DMCs dimensions for NV performance. The literature needs to understand if all three DMCs dimensions are universally relevant for performance or their effects are contingent to the level of environmental change. 1.2 Research questions In this dissertation, we would like to contribute to our knowledge about the capabilities of NVs, by analyzing a specific capability: DMCs. In so doing, we assume that certain number of organizational capabilities emerge from the characteristics of the executives themselves rather than from organizational routines and procedures (Teece, 2012). This assumption is especially important in the context of NVs. NVs limited organizational experience makes capabilities residing in the managers to gain relevance when explaining heterogeneity in performance. The research gaps we identify in our literature review lead to two main overarching sets of questions. The first set of questions is related to providing a framework for measuring DMCs in the context of NVs. In spite of being a widely studiedd concept, no study to our knowledge offers a framework with which to measure DMCs that takes into accountt its three dimensions in combination. Most existing studies are theoretical articles that try to foster the concept of DMCs or use the concept in an implicit way (to explain other phenomena). Most importantly, very little is known about the measurement of DMCs in the particular context of NVs (Townsend and Busenitz, 2014). As companies evolve in their lifecycle the challenges and opportunities they face vary significantly, signaling the possibility that different team characteristics may be more or less important at various phases in the development of NVs (Brixy, Sternberg, and Stüber, 2012). Surprisingly, current research lacks longitudinal studies that examine the characteristics of NV managerial teams across different stages of the entrepreneurial process (Klotz, Hmieleski, Bradley, and Busenitz, 2014). The second set of questions relates to the deployment of DMCs in NVs. How could DMCs¿ underpinnings help to improve NVs' performance? Are all of their underpinnings equally important? What roles do the features of the team, the firm itself, and ultimately the degree of change in the environment play in the relationship between DMCs¿ underpinnings and NV performance? All three DMCs underpinnings -managerial human capital, managerial social capital and managerial cognition- develop through managers prior experiences (Helfat and Martin, 2015); therefore, the same experience may contribute simultaneously to the three attributes of DMCs (Beck and Wiersema, 2013). Measuring all three DMCs dimensions and exploring empirically the relationships between them as we do in this study is hence important in order to not incur in errors and misinterpretations in their assessment. 1.3 Objectives The overall objective of this dissertation is the study of DMCs in NVs. More specifically, this study aims to understand the deployment of DMCs in NVs, its implications for performance, and the contingencies exerted by the degree of environmental change. We begin by offering a framework for measuring DMCs. This framework allows us to explore how these capabilities impact NVs¿ performance by assessing the relative importance of the three distinct underpinnings of DMCs -managerial human capital, managerial social capital and managerial cognition- during the early years of activity of entrepreneurial ventures. Importantly, we seek to understand the role that the features of the team, the firm and ultimately the environment play in the relationship between DMCs¿ underpinnings and NV performance. The dissertation seeks to make several contributions to the literature on NVs as well as to the literature on DMCs. Overall; we move the body of literature on DMCs from its original theoretical conceptualization into its actual empirical measurement and assessment. We provide a broad perspective on how DMCs are configured in the early stages of NVs¿ development. Our empirical study reveals that not all DMCs' dimensions -managerial human capital, social capital, and cognition- have the same impact on performance during the early years of a venture's activity. Also, some of these dimensions may prove to be universally relevant, whereas the effect of others may be contingent to the level of environmental change.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversidad Pablo de Olavide. Departamento de Organización de Empresas y Marketinges_ES
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenes_ES
dc.rightsAtribución-NoComercial-SinDerivadas 3.0 España*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/es/*
dc.subjectGestión de empresases_ES
dc.subjectNuevas empresases_ES
dc.subjectDirectivos de empresaes_ES
dc.titleDynamic managerial capabilities in new ventures : an empirical analysises_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/doctoralThesises_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsopenAccesses_ES


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