Person:
Zaderenko Partida, Ana Paula

Profesor/a Titular de Universidad
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First Name
Ana Paula
Last Name
Zaderenko Partida
Affiliation
Universidad Pablo de Olavide
Department
Sistemas Físicos, Químicos y Naturales
Research Center
Area
Química Física
Research Group
Química Física de Fases Condensadas e Interfases
PAIDI Areas
Física, Química y Matemáticas
PhD programs
Identifiers
UPO investigaORCIDScopus Author IDDialnet ID

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 9 of 9
  • Publication
    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy applied to the evaluation of penetration depth of bactericidal treatments based on silver nanoparticles in limestones.
    (Elsevier, 2018-12-04) Mateo, Maripaz; Becerra, Javier; Zaderenko Partida, Ana Paula; Ortiz, Pilar; Nicolás, Ginés
    In this work, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to evaluate the depth penetration of nanoparticles employed as biocidal treatment in stones. The penetration of a biocidal treatment, based on silver nanoparticles, was studied on limestones from Utrera (Seville, Spain). This stone was commonly employed in historical buildings in south Spain. Silver nanoparticles provide an effective protection against bacterial development, but their assessment depends on the depth penetration of the particles. Therefore, LIBS depth profiles were used to localize the nanomaterials in the stone matrix to determine silver penetration with the aim of controlling the treatment process. The characteristic emission of Ag(I) at 338.289 nm was successfully identified in the LIBS spectra of thetreated samples, demonstrating the capability of the LIBS technique to be used for the de tection of silver nanoparticles in limestone. In addition, LIBS depth profiles were useful for characterizing the diffusion of this nanoparticle in the calcareous matrix of the limestone. The penetration of the silver bactericidal treatment in the Utrera limestone was estimated to be 130¿230 ¿m by LIBS depth analyses. This proof of concept demonstrates the capability of LIBS for depth analysis of limestone treated with silver nanoparticles and provides a useful tool to characterize the effectiveness of this biocidal treatment.
  • Publication
    Assessment of nanoparticles/nanocomposites to inhibit micro-algal fouling on limestone façades.
    (Taylor and Francis, 2019-05-16) Becerra, Javier; Ortiz, Pilar; Zaderenko Partida, Ana Paula; Karapanagiotis, Ioannis
    This study conducted a comparison between biocide treatments based on nanoparticles of silver, copper, ZnO, TiO2 and silver/ TiO2 nanocomposites to analyse their capability to inhibit microalgal fouling on stone buildings. Biofouling is one of the main alterations on stone façades, causes degradation of their constituent materials and interferes with their aesthetic values. The proposed treatments were tested on a limestone from the historic quarry of Estepa (Spain), widely used as construction material in the South of Spain. The applicability of the treatments was evaluated by colorimetry. The biocidal effectiveness of the nanoparticles was studied on stone surfaces by multispectral imaging, digital image analysis and optical coherence tomography. This is a low-cost and efficient protocol to validate biocidal treatments for limestone monuments, and our results demonstrate the potential of silver and ZnO nanoparticles as a protective treatment for stone façades. The results have implications for practitioners working on historic buildings.
  • Publication
    Nanolimes doped with quantum dots for stone consolidation assessment.
    (Elsevier, 2019-12-13) Becerra, Javier; Ortiz, Pilar; Martín, José María; Zaderenko Partida, Ana Paula
    Currently, the application of consolidation treatments based on nanolimes (Ca(OH)2 nanoparticles) has become a common practice during the restoration of historical buildings. However, recent studies have showed that their effectiveness on stone materials is lower than expected. This result is due to the accumulation of nanolimes near the surface, which decreases their penetration depth into stone matrix and, consequently, results in a low restoration effectiveness. This research is focused on a new nanocomposite based on Ca(OH)2 nanoparticles doped with ZnO quantum dots whose fluorescence shows the real penetration of the nanomaterial into the stone matrices and allows us to study the affinity between nanolimes and the solvent used in the application in order to improve the penetration of the treatment into stones. Different mixtures of solvents have been probed to improve the penetration depth by analysing their kinetic stabilities and using thin-layer chromatography to evaluate their capacity to transport the nanolimes. Furthermore, a new support for thin-layer chromatography based on mortar has been designed, which has the advantage of having the same chemical composition as the limestones. Moreover, the effectiveness of the treatments was studied on limestones from Puerto de Santa María and Espera (Spain), which have been widely used in historical and contemporary buildings in the southwest of Spain. Nanolimes doped with ZnO quantum dots allow one to choose the optimal solvents for each kind of stone based on their fluorescence from UV radiation. Additionally, the fluorescence of the quantum dots could be used as an indicator of the consolidated areas for cultural heritage applications.
  • Publication
    Synergy achieved in silver-TIO2 nanocomposites for the inhibition of biofouling on limestone.
    (Elsevier, 2018-05-11) Becerra, Javier; Zaderenko Partida, Ana Paula; Sayagués, María Jesús; Ortiz, Rocío; Ortiz, Pilar
    Biodeterioration of stone monuments is estimated to be as high as 20¿30% of the total degradation suffered by Cultural Heritage constructions. With regard to this problem, bactericidal treatments are mainly based on cleaning. These processes, while effective in the short term, require frequent reapplications increasing potential damages to the monument. Silver nanoparticles offer many advantages over traditionally employed products, such as their prolonged biocide efficacy and their low toxicity to humans and environment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the applicability and effectiveness of seven nanocomposite treatments based on titanium dioxide and/or silver nanoparticles to prevent biodeterioration of limestone monuments. These nanocomposites were characterized by UV¿Visible spectrophotometry, Dynamic Light Scattering and Electron Microscopy. To assess their bactericidal activity, accelerated weathering tests were performed on limestones from the quarry of Utrera, a source widely employed in such iconic monuments as the Cathedral of Seville (Spain). Furthermore, the samples of biopatina employed in our assays stemmed from the façades of historical buildings from Seville. Our results show that silver and titanium dioxide nanocomposites stabilized by citrate achieve a high biocide effect while maintaining color alterations at a low level.
  • Publication
    Evaluation of the applicability of nano-biocide treatments on limestones used in cultural heritage.
    (Elsevier, 2019-02-13) Becerra, Javier; Mateo, Maripaz; Ortiz, Pilar; Zaderenko Partida, Ana Paula; Nicolás, Ginés
    One of the main problems in the conservation of historical buildings and archaeological sites is theone caused by biodeterioration. Biopatina, biocrust or biofouling generate aesthetical changes andinduce degradation processes within the stone matrix. In this work, three treatments based on sil-ver nanoparticles and silver/titanium dioxide nanocomposites have been studied as potential biocidesfor limestones: citrate-stabilized silver nanoparticles, silver/TiO2nanocomposites and citrate-stabilizedsilver/TiO2nanocomposites. These treatments were synthesized following a bottom-up method, using ornot a stabilizing agent (citrate), and have been characterized by UV-Visible spectrophotometry, DynamicLight Scattering and Raman spectroscopy. These treatments were applied on limestones from three differ-ent Spanish quarries located in Utrera (Seville), El Puerto de Santa María (Cadiz) and Novelda (Alicante).The aesthetical modification of limestone surfaces was studied by colorimetric techniques and the effec-tiveness of protection against biofouling formation was tested using an accelerated biofouling growthassay. The best results were obtained for the treatments based on citrate-stabilized silver nanoparti-cles. The effectiveness of the treatments depends on their penetration depth in the stone matrix andin this study, we have used Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy to determine the depth profilesof nanocomposite presence in the stone matrix. Our results demonstrate that nanocomposites basedon citrate-stabilized silver nanoparticles can be useful for the treatment of historical buildings andarchaeological sites made of limestone, without producing high colour increments. Additionally, we have demonstrated the suitability of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for the detection of silver/TiO2nanocomposites and for the generation of depth profiles.
  • Publication
    Nanoparticles applied to stone buildings
    (Taylor & Francis, 2019-09-29) Becerra, Javier; Zaderenko Partida, Ana Paula; Gómez-Morón, María Auxiliadora; Ortiz, Pilar
    Stone has been widely used as a construction material since ancient times, and its preservation is crucial in historical and contemporary buildings. Biodeterioration and other alterations cause damage in stone monuments which leads to the need for repeated actions. Nanotechnology is increasing the development of new products for construction and restoration, and new treatments based on nanoparticles have been developed for stone conservation, such as biocides or consolidants. These treatments avoid the disadvantages of traditional products, such as limewater for consolidation or quaternary ammonium salts as biocides and fulfil some of the requirements demanded by cultural heritage, i.e., effectiveness, compatibility with the stone and its aesthetic values, and durability. This manuscript reviews some of the main advances in the development and application of nanoparticles as consolidants and biocides to treat stone cultural heritage.
  • Publication
    Comparison of the performance of a novel nanolime doped with ZnO quantum dots with common consolidants for historical carbonate stone buildings
    (Elsevier, 2020) Becerra Luna, Javier; Zaderenko Partida, Ana Paula; Ortiz Calderón, Rocío; Karapanagiotis, I.
    Decohesion of building materials caused by weathering translates into the need for recurrent interventions with consolidating treatments that often turn out useless for desired long-term consolidation owing to their poor in-depth penetration. Due to this, it is important to develop new products that allow evaluating their penetration in situ. In this work, three commercial consolidants (Estel 1200®, NanoEstel® and Nanorestore®) widely used in stone conservation were compared with a new consolidant nanocomposite (Nanorepair UV). This nanocomposite, which consists of calcium hydroxide nanoparticles doped with zinc oxide quantum dots, allows both consolidation and in situ evaluation of the penetration depth of the treatment, a key variable to assess effectiveness when an in-depth consolidation is required. The treatments were assayed on limestones from two quarries widely used in the construction of monuments in southern Spain. The development of new products devoted to our Cultural Heritage entails specific requirements such as effectiveness, durability and compatibility with the original materials without changing their aesthetic features. The compatibility was studied by colorimetric methods and SEM images to detect the formation of surface layers. The effectiveness of the treatments was quantified by both peeling test and ultrasound propagation speed. Finally, the durability was studied by an accelerated weathering test induced by salt crystallization. The results showed that nanolimes had higher effectiveness and better durability than silica treatments as consolidants for limestones. In addition, Nanorepair UV provided an additional functionality since it allowed measuring the treatment penetration depth in a simple and economical way, by means of ultraviolet illumination, while allowed to distinguish treated areas from untreated ones.
  • Publication
    Synthesis and Characterization of Elongated-Shaped Silver Nanoparticles as a Biocompatible Anisotropic SERS Probe for Intracellular Imaging: Theoretical Modeling and Experimental Verification
    (MDPI, 2019) Caro Salazar, Carlos A.; Quaresma, Pedro; Pereira, Eulália; Franco, Jaime; Pernia Leal, Manuel; García-Martín, Maria Luisa; Royo, José Luis; Merkling, Patrick; Zaderenko Partida, Ana Paula; Pozo, David; Franco, Ricardo; Oliva Montero, José María
    Progress in the field of biocompatible SERS nanoparticles has promising prospects for biomedical applications. In this work, we have developed a biocompatible Raman probe by combining anisotropic silver nanoparticles with the dye rhodamine 6G followed by subsequent coating with bovine serum albumin. This nanosystem presents strong SERS capabilities in the near infrared (NIR) with a very high (2.7 107) analytical enhancement factor. Theoretical calculations reveal the effects of the electromagnetic and chemical mechanisms in the observed SERS effect for this nanosystem. Finite element method (FEM) calculations showed a considerable near field enhancement in NIR. Using density functional quantum chemical calculations, the chemical enhancement mechanism of rhodamine 6G by interaction with the nanoparticles was probed, allowing us to calculate spectra that closely reproduce the experimental results. The nanosystem was tested in cell culture experiments, showing cell internalization and also proving to be completely biocompatible, as no cell death was observed. Using a NIR laser, SERS signals could be detected even from inside cells, proving the applicability of this nanosystem as a biocompatible SERS probe.
  • Publication
    Comparison of the performance of a novel nanolime doped with ZnO quantum dots with common consolidants for historical carbonate stone buildings.
    (Elsevier, 2020-06-09) Becerra Luna, Javier; Zaderenko Partida, Ana Paula; Karapanagiotis, Ioannis; Ortiz Calderón, Rocío; Ortiz, Pilar
    Decohesion of building materials caused by weathering translates into the need for recurrent interventions with consolidating treatments that often turn out useless for desired long-term consolidation owing to their poor indepth penetration. Due to this, it is important to develop new products that allow evaluating their penetration in situ. In this work, three commercial consolidants (Estel 1200®, NanoEstel® and Nanorestore®) widely used in stone conservation were compared with a new consolidant nanocomposite (Nanorepair UV). This nanocomposite, which consists of calcium hydroxide nanoparticles doped with zinc oxide quantum dots, allows both consolidation and in situ evaluation of the penetration depth of the treatment, a key variable to assess effectiveness when an in-depth consolidation is required. The treatments were assayed on limestones from two quarries widely used in the construction of monuments in southern Spain. The development of new products devoted to our Cultural Heritage entails specific requirements such as effectiveness, durability and compatibility with the original materials without changing their aesthetic features. The compatibility was studied by colorimetric methods and SEM images to detect the formation of surface layers. The effectiveness of the treatments was quantified by both peeling test and ultrasound propagation speed.Finally, the durability was studied by an accelerated weathering test induced by salt crystallization. The results showed that nanolimes had higher effectiveness and better durability than silica treatments as consolidants for limestones. In addition, Nanorepair UV provided an additional functionality since it allowed measuring the treatment penetration depth in a simple and economical way, by means of ultraviolet illumination, while allowed to distinguish treated areas from untreated ones.