Person:
Leal Campanario, Rocío

Profesor/a Titular de Universidad
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First Name
Rocío
Last Name
Leal Campanario
Affiliation
Universidad Pablo de Olavide
Department
Fisiología, Anatomía y Biología Celular
Research Center
Area
Fisiología
Research Group
Laboratorio de Neurociencias
PAIDI Areas
Biología y Biotecnología
PhD programs
Papel de las estructuras corticales (prefrontal, premotora, motora, hipocampal), subcorticales (estriado, amígdala, núcleo rojo, centros motores troncoencefálicos) y cerebelares en la adquisición de tareas de aprendizaje asociativo, Mecanismos Cerebrales
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UPO investigaORCIDScopus Author IDWeb of Science ResearcherIDDialnet ID

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 3 of 3
  • Publication
    EFFECTS OF TRANSCRANIAL DIRECT CURRENT STIMULATION (tDCS) ON CORTICAL ACTIVITY: A COMPUTATIONAL MODELING STUDY
    (Elsevier Inc., 2013-01) B. Molaee-Ardekani, J. Márquez-Ruiz, I. Merlet, R. Leal-Campanario, A. Gruart, R. Sánchez-Campusano, G. Birot, G. Ruffini, J.M. Delgado-García, and F. Wendling; Leal Campanario, Rocío; Gruart, Agnès; Sánchez-Campusano, Raudel
    Although it is well-admitted that transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) allows for interacting with brain endogenous rhythms, the exact mechanisms by which externally-applied fields modulate the activity of neurons remain elusive. In this study a novel computational model (a neural mass model including subpopulations of pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons mediating synaptic currents with either slow or fast kinetics) of the cerebral cortex was elaborated to investigate the local effects of tDCS on neuronal populations based on an in-vivo experimental study. Model parameters were adjusted to reproduce evoked potentials (EPs) recorded from the somatosensory cortex of the rabbit in response to air-puffs applied on the whiskers. EPs were simulated under control condition (no tDCS) as well as under anodal and cathodal tDCS fields. Results first revealed that a feed-forward inhibition mechanism must be included in the model for accurate simulation of actual EPs (peaks and latencies). Interestingly, results revealed that externally-applied fields are also likely to affect interneurons. Indeed, when interneurons get polarized then the characteristics of simulated EPs become closer to those of real EPs. In particular, under anodal tDCS condition, more realistic EPs could be obtained when pyramidal cells were depolarized and, simultaneously, slow (resp. fast) interneurons became de- (resp. hyper-) polarized. Geometrical characteristics of interneurons might provide some explanations for this effect.
  • Publication
    TRANSCRANIAL DIRECT-CURRENT STIMULATION MODULATES SYNAPTIC MECHANISMS INVOLVED IN ASSOCIATIVE LEARNING IN BEHAVING RABBITS
    (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2012-04-24) J. Márquez-Ruiz, R. Leal-Campanario, R. Sánchez-Campusano, B. Molaee-Ardekani, F. Wendling, P.C. Miranda, G. Ruffini, A. Gruart, and J.M. Delgado-García; Leal Campanario, Rocío; Sánchez-Campusano, Raudel; Gruart, Agnès
    Transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) is a noninvasive brain stimulation technique that has been successfully applied for modulation of cortical excitability. tDCS is capable of inducing changes in neuronal membrane potentials in a polarity-dependent manner. When tDCS is of sufficient length, synaptically driven aftereffects are induced. The mechanisms underlying these after-effects are largely unknown, and there is a compelling need for animal models to test the immediate effects and after-effects induced by tDCS in different cortical areas and evaluate the implications in complex cerebral processes. Here we show in behaving rabbits that tDCS applied over the somatosensory cortex modulates cortical processes consequent to localized stimulation of the whisker pad or of the corresponding area of the ventroposterior medial (VPM) thalamic nucleus. With longer stimulation periods, poststimulation effects were observed in the somatosensory cortex only after cathodal tDCS. Consistent with the polarity-specific effects, the acquisition of classical eyeblink conditioning was potentiated or depressed by the simultaneous application of anodal or cathodal tDCS, respectively, when stimulation of the whisker pad was used as conditioned stimulus, suggesting that tDCS modulates the sensory perception process necessary for associative learning. We also studied the putative mechanisms underlying immediate effects and after-effects of tDCS observed in the somatosensory cortex. Results when pairs of pulses applied to the thalamic VPM nucleus (mediating sensory input) during anodal and cathodal tDCS suggest that tDCS modifies thalamocortical synapses at presynaptic sites. Finally, we show that blocking the activation of adenosine A1 receptors prevents the long-term depression (LTD) evoked in the somatosensory cortex after cathodal tDCS.
  • Publication
    A VARIABLE OSCILLATOR UNDERLIES THE MEASUREMENT OF TIME INTERVALS IN THE ROSTRAL MEDIAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX DURING CLASSICAL EYEBLINK CONDITIONING IN RABBITS
    (Society for Neuroscience, 2015-11-04) C.R. Caro-Martín, R. Leal-Campanario, R. Sánchez-Campusano, J.M. Delgado-García, A. Gruart; Leal Campanario, Rocío; Sánchez-Campusano, Raudel; Gruart, Agnès
    We were interested in determining whether rostral medial prefrontal cortex (rmPFC) neurons participate in the measurement of conditioned stimulus– unconditioned stimulus (CS-US) time intervals during classical eyeblink conditioning. Rabbits were conditioned with a delay paradigm consisting of a tone as CS. The CS started 50, 250, 500, 1000, or 2000msbefore and coterminated with an air puff (100 ms) directed at the cornea as the US. Eyelid movements were recorded with the magnetic search coil technique and the EMG activity of the orbicularis oculi muscle. Firing activities of rmPFC neurons were recorded across conditioning sessions. Reflex and conditioned eyelid responses presented a dominant oscillatory frequency of 12 Hz. The firing rate of each recorded neuron presented a single peak of activity with a frequency dependent on the CS-US interval (i.e., 12 Hz for 250 ms, 6 Hz for 500 ms, and 3 Hz for 1000 ms). Interestingly, rmPFC neurons presented their dominant firing peaks at three precise times evenly distributed with respect to CS start and also depending on the duration of the CS-US interval (only for intervals of 250, 500, and 1000 ms). No significant neural responses were recorded at very short (50 ms) or long (2000 ms) CS-US intervals. rmPFC neurons seem not to encode the oscillatory properties characterizing conditioned eyelid responses in rabbits, but are probably involved in the determination of CS-US intervals of an intermediate range (250 –1000 ms). We propose that a variable oscillator underlies the generation of working memories in rabbits.